Coronavirus (COVID-19) updates from the Australian Government

Part 5: Statistical Information

Date

Occupational health and safety

Freedom of information

Advertising and market research

Ecologically sustainable development and
environmental performance

Discretionary grants

Occupational health and safety

The Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) Act 1991 and the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 form the legislative basis of Treasury's Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) and Rehabilitation policies.

Treasury's Occupational Health and Safety Committee meets quarterly and comprises representatives from staff, units and the Community and Public Sector Union.

Treasury maintained a close occupational health and safety focus during the extensive refurbishment of the Treasury building. The second stage of the refurbishment process is continuing and the OH&S Committee will maintain its involvement in this process.

Specialist OH&S consultants provide Occupational Health and Safety advice and workstation briefing sessions for employees. In addition, employees can have an extended individual assessment of their workstation. Employees relocating in the second stage of the refurbishment process also received Occupational Health and Safety briefings in August 2001.

The OH&S Committee deals with occupational health and safety issues and policies, staff wellbeing, health and safety performance reporting, accommodation issues and accident and incident reports. The committee also considers reports from the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider, Davidson Trahaire.

Davidson Trahaire provides confidential counseling on work-related and personal matters to all Treasury staff and their families. Quarterly reports allow Treasury to monitor use of the EAP and identify workplace issues that need addressing. No significant issues were identified for action in 2001-02.

Training for OH&S committee members and the departmental OH&S coordinator assisted employees in balancing their work and home lives, recognising the role Treasury plays in promoting staff wellbeing and a healthy lifestyle. All Treasury staff also had access to flu immunizations.

Treasury reviewed and updated the Occupational Health and Safety Policy and Agreement in consultation with the OH&S Committee representatives, the Workplace Relations Committee and the Community and Public Sector Union. The new policy came into effect on 28 May 2002. The Policy Statement provides the framework for the general principles and agreed responsibilities of Treasury managers and staff to foster and maintain a safe and healthy working environment in accordance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act (1991). The OH&S Policy Statement and Agreement is available to all staff on the departmental intranet.

Treasury received 42 accident and incident reports during 2001-02. Three resulted in compensation claims, with one yet to be determined. No notices were given under sections 29, 46 and 47 of the Act.

Workplace assessments are conducted regularly to prevent injuries in the workplace and enhance the safety of employees. The major types of accidents that continue to occur are occupational overuse syndrome and car accidents. All reported accidents and incidents are investigated and acted on.

Freedom of information

Treasury is responsible for handling Freedom of Information matters in respect of the department, the Royal Australian Mint, the Foreign Investment Review Board and the Australian Office of Financial Management.

Treasury's statement under section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 follows. The Australian Competition Tribunal's statement follows the department's statement. The tribunal is a separate agency within the Treasury portfolio but does not publish an annual report.

Treasury - statement

Section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 requires that the department publish detailed information about:

  • the way it is organised and its decision making powers;
  • arrangements for public involvement in the work of the agency;
  • types of documents held by the agency; and
  • how the public can obtain access to these documents.

The following information addresses the formal requirements of section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 in relation to the department.

Organisation of Treasury

Details of Treasury's organisational and top management structure are set out in Part 1, Figure 4 of this report. Treasury's functions, and the decision-making powers exercised in carrying out those functions are described in the departmental overview and corporate governance sections of this report.

Details of the organisation and structure of the Royal Australian Mint, the Foreign Investment Review Board and the Australian Office of Financial Management are published separately in the annual reports of each of those bodies. In summary, the Royal Australian Mint has responsibility for the provision of circulating and numismatic coin for Australia, while the Foreign Investment Review Board advises the Government on foreign investment policy and its administration.

The Australian Office of Financial Management is responsible for the Commonwealth's debt management operations which include debt issuance, portfolio management and debt administration.

Treasury delegations

The Treasurer has delegated certain powers to officials under Acts of Parliament and agreements. These delegations stand in force until renewed and are listed below.

  • The Treasurer has the discretionary power to guarantee the borrowings of some Commonwealth statutory authorities, and in some cases, to delegate his guarantee powers to Treasury officers. The Treasurer has delegated his powers to guarantee the borrowings of Air Services Australia and Australian National Railways to the General Manager, Commonwealth-State Relations Division; Manager, Financial Relations Unit; Manager, Federal Analysis and Reporting Unit; and Manager, Commonwealth-State Taxation Unit.
  • Under section 20 of the States Grants (General Purposes) Act 1994, the Treasurer has delegated the power to make payments of general revenue assistance and revenue replacement payments to the States to the General Manager, Commonwealth-State Relations Division; Manager, Financial Relations Unit; Manager, Federal Analysis and Reporting Unit; and Manager, Commonwealth-State Taxation Unit.
  • Under section 21 of the A New Tax System (Commonwealth-State Financial Arrangements) Act 1999 the Treasurer has delegated the power to make payments to the States under sections 18 and 19 of the Act to the Executive Director, Budget Group; General Manager, Commonwealth-State Relations Division; and General Manager, Budget Policy Division.
  • The Treasurer has delegated certain powers, under the Disposal of Forfeited Articles Direction 1999, to the Controller, Royal Australian Mint; and the Senior Manager, Currency Operations, Reserve Bank of Australia, pursuant to the definition of `an authorised person' in subsection 3(1) of the Crimes (Currency) Act 1981.
  • The Treasurer has delegated certain powers under the Crimes (Currency) Authorisation 1999 to the General Manager, Financial Institutions Division; the Controller, Royal Australian Mint; and the Senior Manager, Currency Operations, Reserve Bank of Australia, pursuant to the definition of `an authorized person' in subsection 3(1) of the Crimes (Currency) Act 1981.
  • The Treasurer has delegated the power under the Currency Delegation 1999 to determine the issue price of coins of certain denominations under subsection 14A(2) of the
    Currency Act 1965 to the Executive Director, Markets Group, and the General Manager, Financial Institutions Division.
  • The authority to approve a range of essentially administrative matters provided for under the Gold Corporation Agreement between the Commonwealth and Goldcorp Australia relating to gold, platinum and silver coins is delegated to the Executive Director, Markets Group and the General Manager, Financial Institutions Division.
  • The Treasurer has authorised the General Manager and the Managers of the Foreign Investment Policy Division, to act on his behalf to approve and conditionally approve various proposals and in specific circumstances, to make an order under subsections 22(1) or 21A(2) of the Foreign Acquisitions and Takeovers Act 1975.
  • The Treasurer has delegated to Treasury the authority to vote on routine matters arising from the Treasurer's Governorship of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank Group, the Asian Development Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
  • The Treasurer holds certain delegated powers under the Constitution and the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 in relation to departmental financial management. These powers are delegated to nominated departmental officers.
  • The powers under subsections 147(2) and 601DC(2) of the Corporations Act to consent to a name being available to a body corporate have been delegated to the General Manager, Corporate Governance Division and the Specialist Adviser, Corporate Governance Division.
  • The Assistant Treasurer, on behalf of the Treasurer, has delegated to a departmental officer the authorisation under section 35(1) of the Archives Act 1983 relating to arrangements for exemption of records from the open access period.
  • The Minister for Finance and Administration has delegated to the Treasurer, the Secretary of the Treasury and other departmental officers the authorisation under section 56(2) of the Archives Act 1983 for approval of access to records not in the open access period.
  • The Minister has delegated to the General Manager, Corporate Governance Division and the Specialist Adviser, Corporate Governance Division power under subsections 147(2) and 601DC(2) of the Corporations Act 2001 to consent to a name being available to a body corporate.

Arrangements for outside participation

People or organisations outside the Commonwealth administration may participate in forming policy or administering enactments and schemes for which Treasury is responsible by making representations in writing to the Treasury portfolio ministers, to the Secretary to the Treasury, or directly to agencies in the Treasury portfolio.

Additionally, the following arrangements also exist for participation by bodies outside the Commonwealth administration in forming policy and administering enactments or schemes.

Board of Taxation

The Board of Taxation is a non-statutory advisory body established by the Treasurer in August 2000 to advise on the design and operation of Australia's tax laws, ensuring full and effective community consultation in the design and implementation of tax legislation.

The board comprises ten members; seven are drawn from the business and community sectors, including the chair. These members are appointed on a part-time basis and with a view to their ability personally to contribute a broad range of relevant business, practitioner and broader community knowledge and experience to the development of the tax system. The appointments are for two years and members may be reappointed. The Secretary to the Treasury, the Commissioner of Taxation and the First Parliamentary Counsel serve as ex officio members.

The board provides advice to the Treasurer on:

  • the quality and effectiveness of tax legislation and the processes for its development, including the processes of community consultation and other aspects of tax design;
  • improvements to the general integrity and functioning of the taxation system;
  • research and other studies it commissions on topics approved or referred by the Treasurer; and
  • other taxation matters referred to it by the Treasurer.

The Treasury, with the assistance of the Australian Taxation Office, provides secretariat support.

Business Regulation Advisory Group

The Business Regulation Advisory Group is a non-statutory consultative body of nine part-time members, appointed from the Australian business community and legal and accounting professions. These members provide advice on initiatives under the Government's Corporate Law Economic Reform Program and related financial services reform legislation.

The Corporate Law Economic Reform Program refocuses and improves laws governing Australian corporations and the financial markets to promote business and economic development. The Business Regulation Advisory Group provides an ongoing means of direct consultation with the business community on program position papers and draft legislation, providing their constituencies' input and opinions on proposed changes.

Commonwealth Consumer Affairs Advisory Council

The Commonwealth Consumer Affairs Advisory Council is a non-statutory body established by the Minister for Financial Services and Regulation in May 1999 to provide independent advice on current and emerging consumer issues.

The Commonwealth Consumer Affairs Advisory Council comprises eight members, including the chair. Members present a range of consumer perspectives and all serve as individuals rather than as representatives of organisations or interest groups.

The Commonwealth Consumer Affairs Advisory Council meets regularly to investigate, advise and report to the Minister on consumer issues the Minister refers to them.

Corporations and Markets Advisory Committee

The Corporations and Markets Advisory Committee (CAMAC) was established under Part 9 of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission Act 1989 (the ASIC Act). It was formed in September 1989. Prior to 11 March 2002, the Advisory Committee was known as the Companies and Securities Advisory Committee. It continues under section 261 of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission Act 2001 (the ASIC Act).

CAMAC is a body corporate, comprising part-time members appointed by the Treasurer. Members are selected from throughout Australia on the basis of their knowledge of, or experience in, business, the administration of companies, the financial markets, law, economics or accounting. The Chairman of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) is an ex-officio member of the Advisory Committee by the operation of section 147 of the ASIC Act.

The functions of CAMAC, set out in subsection 148(1) of the ASIC Act, are on its own initiative or when requested by the Minister, to advise the Minister, and to make to the Minister such recommendations as it thinks fit, about any matter connected with:

a) a proposal to make corporations legislation, or to make amendments of the corporations legislation (other than the excluded provisions);

b) the operation or administration of the corporations legislation (other than the excluded provisions);

c) law reform in relation to the corporations legislation (other than the excluded provisions);

d) companies or a segment of the financial products and financial services industry; or

e) a proposal for improving the efficiency of the financial markets.

In fulfilling these functions, CAMAC seeks to stimulate and lead public debate on the enhancement of standards for corporations and participants in financial markets, and propose suitable regulatory reform when necessary.

To achieve its statutory objectives, CAMAC is assisted by its legal sub-committee and considers public submissions on its discussion papers. It s
eeks to ensure that all interested people in the commercial community have an adequate opportunity to make submissions on particular matters and otherwise express their views to CAMAC.

Financial Sector Advisory Council and Task Force

The Financial Sector Advisory Council is a non-statutory body established in April 1998 by the Treasurer as part of the Government's response to the Financial System Inquiry. The council brings together a broad range of financial sector experts to provide advice to the Government on policies to facilitate the growth of a strong and competitive financial system. The Treasurer appoints members to the council in their personal capacity for two years, subject to their continued involvement in the relevant area of the financial sector.

The council can act on its own motion or a government reference. Submissions made to the Financial Sector Advisory Council and its recommendations to Treasury ministers are confidential.

Treasury provides secretariat support to the council.

Foreign Investment Review Board

The Foreign Investment Review Board is a non-statutory body that advises the Government on foreign investment policy and its administration. The board comprises four members; three, including the chair, are drawn from the business and community sectors. These members are appointed on a part-time basis. The General Manager of the Foreign Investment Policy Division also serves on the board as an executive member.

The board:

  • examines proposals by foreign interests for acquisitions and new investment projects in Australia and, against the background of the Government's foreign investment policy, makes recommendations to the Treasurer on those proposals;
  • advises the Government on foreign investment matters generally;
  • fosters an awareness and understanding, both in Australia and abroad, of the Government's foreign investment policy;
  • provides guidance, where necessary, to foreign investors so that their proposals conform with policy; and
  • monitors and ensures compliance with foreign investment policy.

The board's functions are advisory only. Responsibility for the Government's foreign investment policy and for making decisions on proposals rests with the Treasurer.

Financial Services Reform Implementation Consultative Committee

The Financial Services Reform Implementation Consultative Committee assists in developing regulations for the Financial Services Reform Act 2001, which introduces a harmonised licensing, disclosure and conduct framework for the financial services industry. The committee includes participants from 40 key interest groups representing the financial services industry and consumers.

Consultation arrangements regarding economic conditions

Treasury officers conduct regular private discussions with companies and organisations to monitor, analyse and report on economic conditions and prospects. They provide regular briefings and analysis of liaison findings to the Treasurer.

Categories of documents held by the Treasury

Treasury holds the following categories of documents and files, including correspondence, analysis and policy advice by Treasury officers, comments on cabinet submissions and drafts of these and other documents. Treasury puts an indexed list of its policy file titles on the web site (www.treasury.gov.au) every six months.

Representations to Treasury portfolio ministers

Treasury holds representations made to Treasury ministers on matters falling within their portfolio responsibilities, including:

  • borrowing money on the public credit of the Commonwealth
  • business law and practice
  • census and statistics
  • Commonwealth-State financial relations
  • consumer affairs
  • corporate and securities law
  • corporate insolvency
  • currency and legal tender
  • economic, fiscal and monetary policy
  • excise
  • financial sector policy
  • foreign exchange
  • foreign investment in Australia
  • international economic conditions
  • prices surveillance
  • structural reform
  • superannuation
  • taxation
  • valuation services
Working files

Treasury holds files dealing with policy and administration in each of the areas falling within the responsibilities of the Treasury portfolio detailed above. The documents on these files include correspondence, analysis and policy advice by Treasury officers, comments on cabinet submissions and drafts of these and other documents.

Documents on internal departmental administration

Treasury documents relating to staff and departmental organisation and operation include personal records, organisation and staffing records, financial and expenditure records, and internal operations such as office procedures and instructions.

Program documents

Treasury holds documents relating to grants that it provides to other levels of government and to certain organisations under the programs it administers.

Documents open to public access

A detailed listing of Treasury documents published during the year and available on request - publications, papers, plans and annual reports - is available on the Treasury website (www.treasury.gov.au), or from the Government Info Shops in each capital city.

Facilities for access to documents

If a member of the public requests a document and Treasury approves access, Treasury will provide copies of documents after the applicant pays any charges.

Alternatively, applicants may arrange to inspect documents at the Treasury, Langton Crescent, Parkes ACT between 9.00 am and 5.00 pm, Monday to Friday (except public and public service holidays).

Freedom of information applications and initial contact points

Corporate Services Division coordinates requests under the Freedom of Information Act 1982. Applicants seeking access under the Act to Treasury documents should apply in writing to:

The Secretary
Department of the Treasury
Langton Crescent
PARKES ACT 2600
Attention: Freedom of Information Coordinator

An application fee of $30 or a written request, pursuant to subsection 30A(1) of the Act, that the application fee be waived should accompany requests. Telephone inquiries should be directed to the Freedom of Information Coordinator, telephone (02) 6263 3015, between 9.00 am and 5.00 pm Monday to Friday (except public or public service holidays).

Officers of the senior executive service in Treasury can grant or refuse requests for access to documents under section 23 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982. In accordance with section 54 of the Act, an applicant may, within 30 days of receiving notification of a decision under the Act, apply to the Secretary to the Treasury, seeking an internal review of a decision to refuse a request. The prescribed fee of $40 should accompany the application. A Treasury officer who has been authorised under section 23 to make decisions on internal review (usually an Executive Director) will conduct an independent review.

Freedom of information activity

In 2001-02, Treasury received 16 requests for access to documents under the Freedom of Information Act 1982, compared with 36 requests in 2000-01. Further details are set out in Table 15.

Table 15: Freedom of Information statistics 2001-02

Description

Number

Requests received(a)

On hand at 1 July 2002

Received

9

16

Break down across Treasury

Treasurer

Executive

Budget Group

Economic Group

Markets Group

Corporate Services Division

0

0

7

0

9

0

Action on requests

Access in full

Access in part

Access refused or no documents located

Transferred in whole(b)

Withdrawn/Lapsed

Current as at 30 June 2002

4

2

6

3

7

3

Internal review

Applications

Review by Administrative Appeals Tribunal(c)

Outstanding at 1 July 2002

New applications

Withdrawn

1

1

0

0

Fees and charges

Total application fees collected

Total charges collected

Total application fees and charges collected

$460

$3,351

$3,811

(a) A request does not include an internal review or an appeal to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.
(b) Section 16 of the Freedom of Information Act provides that, as far as possible, the most appropriate agency will deal with a Freedom of Information request, regardless of which agency receives it.
(c) Details are provided in Part 3, Internal and external scrutiny section of this report.

Australian Competition Tribunal statement

The tribunal is an agency within the Treasury portfolio and its section 8 statement follows as it does not publish an annual report.

Establishment

The tribunal was established under the Trade Practices Act 1965 and continues under the Trade Practices Act 1974.

Organisation

The tribunal consists of a president and such number of deputy presidents and other members the Governor-General appoints. A presidential member must be a federal court judge. Other members must have knowledge of, or experience in industry, commerce, economics, law or public administration. For the purposes of hearing and determining proceedings, the tribunal is constituted by a presidential member and two non-presidential members. Currently, all presidential members are judges of the Federal Court of Australia.

The tribunal has no staff or physical resources of its own. The Federal Court of Australia manages the tribunal's funds and provides registry services and administrative support. The registry receives documents, arranges tribunal sittings and does general administration.

Functions and powers

The tribunal is a review body that re-hears or reconsiders matters. It may perform all the functions and exercise all the powers of the original decision-maker and affirm, set aside or vary the original decision.

The tribunal hears applications for review of determinations of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission granting or revoking authorisations that permit conduct and arrangements (including company mergers and acquisitions) that otherwise would be prohibited under the Trade Practices Act because of their anti-competitive effect.

The Act establishes a legislative regime to facilitate third party access to the services of certain essential facilities of national significance, such as electricity grids or natural gas pipelines.

The tribunal also hears applications for review of determinations of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission on exclusive dealing. The tribunal also can inquire into and report to the minister on whether a non-conference ocean carrier has a substantial degree of market power on a trade route.

Arrangements for outside participation

Tribunal review proceedings, except under special circumstances, are public.

When a new review application is made to the tribunal, the tribunal ascertains who made submissions to, or registered their interest with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission or the National Competition Council on the decision. The tribunal directs the applicant to serve the application on each interested party. At the same time, these parties are advised when the application will first come before the tribunal, and their entitlement to seek leave to intervene in the proceedings.

The tribunal may permit a person to intervene in the proceedings before it. Participants may appear on their own behalf or represent a firm or association, subject to the tribunal's approval, or, be represented by a barrister or solicitor.

Categories of documents the tribunal holds

The tribunal maintains the following categories of documents:

  • documents lodged with the registrar on particular proceedings, including applications, notices of appearance, statements of facts and contentions, and witness statements;
  • correspondence concerning particular tribunal proceedings;
  • tribunal decisions and reasoning;
  • reports on tribunal inquiries into shipping matters;
  • register of applications made to the tribunal;
  • documents concerning administrative and financial aspects of the tribunal's operations; and
  • general correspondence.

The public may inspect the following categories of documents free of charge:

  • documents lodged with the registrar in respect of particular proceedings (except where the Act or the tribunal restricts public access on the ground of confidentiality);
  • tribunal decisions and reasoning;
  • reports on tribunal inquiries into shipping matters; and
  • register of applications made to the tribunal.

The public can obtain copies of the above four categories of documents after paying the fees set out in the Trade Practices Regulations.

Facilities for access to documents

Facilities are provided to access documents from 9.00 am to 4.00 pm, Monday to Friday (except public and public service holidays).

If an applicant does not live in Sydney, alternative arrangements could reduce the inconvenience to the applicant.

Freedom of information applications and initial contact points

General inquiries relating to freedom of information should be directed to:

Registrar
Australian Competition Tribunal
Level 16
Law Courts Building
Queens Square
SYDNEY NSW 2000

Telephone: (02) 9230 8567
Facsimile: (02) 9230 8535
DX: 613 - Sydney

The Registrar of the Tribunal, as principal officer, can deny access to a document under the Freedom of Information Act 1982.

Freedom of information activity

The tribunal did not receive any requests for access to documents under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 in 2001-02.

Advertising and market research

Table 16: 2001-02 Treasury expenditure for advertising and market research

Vendor

Purpose

Cost ($)

Output Group 2.1 (Budget)

   

Mitchell & Partners Australia Pty Limited

Community Information Programme - Abolition of FID, Stamp Duty on Marketable Securities and availability of Refunds of Excess Imputation Credits

487,605

Cultural Partners Australia

Community Information Programme - Abolition of FID, Stamp Duty on Marketable Securities and availability of Refunds of Excess Imputation Credits

194,617

Quantum Market Research

Community Information Programme - Abolition of FID, Stamp Duty on Marketable Securities and availability of Refunds of Excess Imputation Credits

107,216

Black is White Communications Pty Limited

Community Information Programme - Abolition of FID, Stamp Duty on Marketable Securities and availability of Refunds of Excess Imputation Credits

2,970

Total Output Group 2.1

 

792,408

Output Group 3.1 (Markets)

   

Starcom (Worldwide) Australia Pty Limited

Submissions for the review of the Managed Investments Act 1998.

17,765

Total Output Group 3.1

 

17,765

Total

 

810,173

Ecologically sustainable development

Treasury participates in government forums on environmental issues and actively pursues measures to minimise the detrimental effects of its activities on the environment. Treasury belongs to various property and building industry groups including the Australian Property Institute and the Facilities Management Association of Australia; this facilitates the exchange of ideas and information on aspects of property and building management and environmental management.

With the recent refurbishment of its building, Treasury has taken the opportunity to introduce best practice initiatives to meet and improve on targets relating to government policy on environmental matters.

Energy management

The incorporation of contemporary energy management practices has reduced overall energy consumption to meet Commonwealth energy consumption targets.

Building design

The building design incorporates leading edge technology, which has effected an overall reduction in energy usage.

Building management system

Treasury's building is controlled by a building management system that provides energy management and reporting facilities. Tenancy areas are metered separately to allow monitoring, profiling and diagnosis of consumption. Incoming electricity supplies have power analysers fitted; these provide instant reading of kilowatt consumption, load, power factor correction, kVA, and line voltage. The building management system monitors all of these.

Energy audit

As required after a building refurbishment, Treasury reviewed and audited its building energy management practices. The report reviewed design specifications and actual performance, and made recommendations for further improving energy usage. The report provides a working Energy Management Plan that reflects Treasury's objective of responsible energy management.

Power supply

The base building and tenancy power supplies are separate to allow accurate assessment of tenancy light and power consumption. Similarly, smaller tenancy power boards cover areas of 540m² to differentiate consumption.

Lighting

Timer switches control all general lighting in the building. Lights only operate during standard working hours although manually operated pass switches turn on lights in specific areas for up to two hours, after-hours.

An energy audit, after the lighting control system was installed, indicated electricity consumption had decreased by 10 to 15 per cent.

High performance light fittings have proved to be 35 per cent more efficient than standard fittings with low ballasts.

Air-conditioning

After-hours air-conditioning zones are smaller than before the refurbishment. The base building plant configuration economically handles these requirements.

Environment management system

Treasury is developing an environmental management system to be implemented by December.

Paper and cardboard products

Treasury has recycled paper and cardboard products for a number of years. A local recycling firm collects desktop and workplace containers of paper and cardboard products. Classified waste paper is pulped and staff kitchen facilities use a recycling bin system that simplifies the separation of recyclable items that previously would have gone to landfill. This reduces the amount of waste sent to landfill by over 30 per cent.

Treasury's central reproduction area procures paper that is made from 80 per cent recycled fibre and actively encourages other areas to use recycled paper.

Toner cartridges

Treasury currently uses genuine printer and facsimile toner cartridges which the supplier recycles.

Compost recycling

All Treasury's staff kitchens have sealed compost waste containers. The service enables compost waste which would have gone to landfill (creating greenhouse gases), to be recycled organically. In the last year, Treasury recycled around 6,000 kilograms of compost, 20 per cent more than the previous year.

Procurement

Treasury purchases goods and services in accordance with the environmental procurement policy as set out in the Commonwealth Procurement Guidelines. This ensures that goods and services are:

  • environmentally sound in manufacture;
  • reusable or recyclable;
  • designed and made for reliability and long life; and
  • environmental best practice in energy efficiency and/or energy consumption.

Treasury recently entered into a whole-of-government contract (negotiated by the Australian Greenhouse Office) to purchase electricity, with some from green power sources.

Discretionary grants

During 2001-02, Treasury administered two discretionary grants.

The Securities Institute's national prize, valued at $500, for the Mergers and Acquisitions subject, is sponsored by the Takeovers Panel.

The Australian National University, Bachelor of Economics prize in Economics III is sponsored by the Treasury. The value of the prize is $500.